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gertrude

December 2017

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National Poetry Day

I’m late to this, only just realised it was on. The theme is memory, i.e. poetry you remember well enough to recite.

Spring & Fall: to a young child

Margaret, are you grieving
Over Goldengrove unleaving?
Leaves, like the things of man, you
With your fresh thoughts care for, can you?
Ah! as the heart grows older
It will come to such sights colder
By and by, nor spare a sigh
Though worlds of wanwood leafmeal lie;
And yet you wíll weep and know why.
Now no matter, child, the name:
Sorrow's springs are the same.
Nor mouth had, no nor mind, expressed
What héart héard of, ghóst guéssed:
It is the blight man was born for,
It is Margaret you mourn for.

G M Hopkins

I learned this when I was about eleven and it’s still stuck in my head.

Once more unto the breach, dear friends, once more;
Or close the wall up with our English dead!
In peace there’s nothing so becomes a man,
As modest stillness and humility;
But when the blast of war blows in our ears,
Then imitate the action of the tiger:
Stiffen the sinews, conjure up the blood,
Disguise fair nature with hard-favoured rage:
Then lend the eye a terrible aspect;
Let it pry through the portage of the head,
Like the brass cannon; let the brow o’erwhelm it
As fearfully as doth a galled rock
O’erhang and jutty his confounded base,
Swill’d with the wild and wasteful ocean.
Now set the teeth and stretch the nostril wide;
Hold hard the breath and bend up every spirit
To his full height. On, on, you noblest English,
Whose blood is fet from fathers of war-proof!
Fathers that, like so many Alexanders,
Have in these parts from morn till even fought,
And sheathed their swords for lack of argument.
Dishonour not your mothers: now attest,
That those whom you call’d fathers did beget you.
Be copy now to men of grosser blood,
And teach them how to war. And you, good yeoman,
Whose limbs were made in England, show us here
The mettle of your pasture: let us swear
That you are worth your breeding; which I doubt not;
For there is none of you so mean and base,
That hath not noble lustre in your eyes.
I see you stand like greyhounds in the slips,
Straining upon the start. The game’s afoot:
Follow your spirit; and upon this charge,
Cry ‘God for Harry! England! and Saint George!'

I just scored 100% in The Telegraph’s poetry quiz, which proves that poetry learned when young lasts you a lifetime.

Comments

(Anonymous)

Gerard Manley Hopkins

It's interesting how much we change in our likes and dislikes. When we 'did' Hopkins for A level English Literature, back in the dark ages, I loathed him. Now? I won't say he's a favourite but there have been times as an adult when I've been comforted by his words.

Re: Gerard Manley Hopkins

I also did Hopkins for A-Level way back but unlike you, loved him then and still do. I know what you mean about the comfort.

(Anonymous)

Hopkins

It's interesting how much we change in our likes and dislikes. When we 'did' Hopkins for A level English Literature, back in the dark ages, I loathed him. Now? I won't say he's a favourite but there have been times as an adult when I've been comforted by his words.

(I'm not anonymous but there seems to be nowhere to sign in using Wordpress! Nicky Slade)

Re: Hopkins

Oops, sorry, I should have replied to the comment with your name on. LJ is having a few problems at the moment. What's new?