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gertrude

April 2018

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reading

January Books



Bury Her Deep, Catriona McPherson
Penelope’s Prefects, Judith Carr
I Capture the Castle, Dodie Smith
The Case of the Missing Servant, Tarquin Hall *L
Death of a Village, M C Beaton *L
Death of a Dustman, M C Beaton *L
Juliet, Naked, Nick Hornby
Mrs Malory and Any Man’s Death, Hazel Holt
Little Women, Louisa May Alcott
Going Dutch, Katie Fforde
Death at Wentwater Court, a Daisy Dalrymple Mystery, Carola Dunn
The Winter Garden Mystery, Carola Dunn




I soon tired of Penelope and her Prefects so I abandoned the book. I just wasn’t in the mood for it. Going Dutch is boring unless you like a) barges, b) non-stop eating and drinking c) spineless women. I will stick to Katie Fforde’s earlier books as I haven’t liked any of the recent ones.

Juliet, Naked, I enjoyed very much. I see it’s been picked for The TV Book Club but I've watched that programme once and for the last time. A dull but harmless man is obsessed with an obscure musician who produced one great album, Juliet, then apparently disappeared. Thanks to the internet Duncan discovers the other two thousand people in the world who share his interest and devotes many hours to song analysis and conspiracy theories about what has happened to the singer, Tucker Crowe. This leaves his partner Annie out in the cold until a sudden and surprising role reversal. Nobody does this sort of obsession better than Nick Hornby and he's spot on about music and the internet. I also enjoyed the depiction of Gooleness, the hopeless seaside town where the couple live. I liked the first part of the book, full of humour, more than the second: myths should remain mythical, IMO.

Mrs Malory needs no introduction. I like the books so much that I read them quickly and then realize what a long time it will be before I see another.

I picked on Daisy Dalrymple thanks to The Book People. The Honourable Daisy has lost both brother and fiancé in the First World War. Not wanting to live with her mother or the relatives who inherited the family estate, she earns her own living as a journalist, writing articles about country houses for Town and Country. Her background makes her an acceptable guest and she is nicely on the spot for any murders that may be taking place. I suppose there are bound to be comparisons with that other 1920s female sleuth, Dandy Gilver but the two series are very different. I’d say the Daisy books are lighter but very enjoyable. As soon as I’d finished Death at Wentwater Court I started on the next one.

Comments

I was going to ask if you thought I would like Daisy Dalrymple, but I see you went straight on to the second! I think I shall treat myself to the set from The Book People soon.
They are airy light but Daisy and her policeman friend are engaging. Better than Agatha Raisin, I'd say and I'm not above those. I thought I might as well try them while I was picking up other bargains...