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gertrude

August 2018

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life on mars

Books on the BBC

Quite a bookfest on the BBC at the moment and I’ve been joining in with some of it. All the programmes are mentioned on the linked page. I started with Faulks on Fiction, in which the curly-haired one began with ‘The Hero’. This plodded along on the lines of : "Faulks is a hero on account of his barnet, his ability to walk and talk at the same time and his excellent ‘noddies’." There was not an original or interesting thought in the whole programme and it was incredibly shallow (BBC2) compared with Birth of the British Novel (BBC4). I’d never heard of Henry Hitchings and he’s less easy on the eye than Faulks but his look at eighteenth century novels was very interesting, particularly on Richardson and Sterne.

Scheduled well after my bedtime was In Their Own Words, a compilation of interviews with British novelists; I recorded it to watch the next day. If you click on the link to the programme it tells you exactly when each piece was recorded and how long it lasted. I disliked the narration but was fascinated by the subject matter. Several of the clips I had seen before, such as Evelyn Waugh being interviewed by John Freeman on Face to Face. Many were quite new to me; I’d never seen or, more to the point heard, Elizabeth Bowen or Aldous Huxley. It was a wonderful glimpse not only of dead authors but of a different culture, one of clipped accents, no holds barred questions (ever seen Mark Lawson Talks To…?) and people smoking while being interviewed. There was no George Orwell, of course, because the BBC wiped all the tapes.

Where today is there a programme like Monitor? You’d think things had dumbed down, perish the thought! (OK, Arena puts out some good programmes.)

A curious feature of these three programmes was that Martin Amis popped up on each one with something to say. I don’t mind that at all; like his father he’s a good critic. Speaking of Dad, here he is. To save you even that trouble, see below for that same 1958 interview with Simon Raven. The presenter is Huw Weldon.

Comments

I have never watched 'Mark Lawson Talks To...' mostly because my eyes always read it as 'Mark Lawson Talks Down To...'
Ha ha! I find him sycophantic. I treasure a Dead Ringers (?) moment which went, 'Mark Lawson uses his bald head to reflect on...'

(Anonymous)

I wasn't impressed by the Faulks programme. Wasn't impressed by his last novel either! Caught a bit of In Their Own Words. Amazing to see Elizabeth Bowen talking about her work. I'll change my mind about Faulks if he's good on Austen. We'll see
Nicola@vintagereads
I haven't liked any of Faulks' books I've read.
Forgot to mention that I also watched The Beauty of Books which was good.